Literature – fiction especially – offers a crucial window into the lives of others, promoting empathy and understanding in a way that travelling somewhere rarely does. By not translating more widely, publishers are denying us greater exposure to one of reading’s most vital functions. Compare that Anglophone two or three per cent to figures in France, where 27% of books published are in translation. And if that sounds a lot, you might care to know that in Spain it’s 28%, Turkey 40%, and Slovenia a whopping 70%.

Hephzibah Anderson. "Why won’t English speakers read books in translation?"BBC  9 September 2014.

If the writing is there, what you want for your writing will come, maybe not in the timeframe you want or in the package you originally envisioned, but it will come. Perhaps I tell myself this because like most writers, I’m putting in the work and I’m waiting and I am hoping something comes of it.

Roxane Gay. “Too Many of Us, Too Much Noise.” HTMLGIANT 28 July 2011

The summer issue of aaduna is up and running, with stunning stories and poetry. Enjoy!
“aaduna seeks creative visionaries who find refuge and their sense of the world within the complexities and ironies of the written word, as well as those compelling visual images, which are lastingly impressionable.”

The summer issue of aaduna is up and running, with stunning stories and poetry. Enjoy!

aaduna seeks creative visionaries who find refuge and their sense of the world within the complexities and ironies of the written word, as well as those compelling visual images, which are lastingly impressionable.”

On “Notes from a Discarded Memoir.”

"Yet despite such specific, searing details, “Notes from a Discarded Memoir” is more than a voyeuristic look at African poverty. The fears and loneliness expressed by the narrator evoke the universal anxieties of childhood, when all of us (even the most coddled) were ultimately powerless and at the mercy of adults. The children in this narrative grapple with dread mysteries in a way that I think must be universal to children. When his parents are asleep, silent, in the next room, the narrator wonders in terror if they’re still alive. An elderly neighbor (who to the reader’s eyes appears utterly harmless) is a figure of utter dread to the narrator’s sister. The children suffer petty injustice when they are beaten by a prefect for being late to school. A man with a macabre sense of humor tells the narrator a story that gives him nightmares. There is little of lightness in this story.

By the end, it is clear that books and education will be the narrator’s escape from this place. As an adult, he has no desire to return to the dilapidated “blocks” of his childhood. Yet he knows that he is forever marked by them.” 

-From Vanessa Fogg’s review of One Throne Magazinethe Summer Issue

Olu Oguibe: The Uncertainty of Geographies

"Our bond with the site of our nativity is a largely one-way affair. It is an ambivalent bond borne out of a one-sided loyalty and a proclivity to possess, a desperate striving to belong, to lay claim to something that lays no claim in return. Severed from the womb and the body that bore us and hauled into the void of life and existence, we crave to attach ourselves to something, a moment, a location, an event; we crave an anchor which we readily find in the contours of the house of our upbringing, in the streets of our childhood, in the city of our birth. But the city has a different desire and a different response, for we need the city more than the city needs us."